Tuesday, March 15, 2016

Amazon's Best Books of March: Part Two



A new look at an old disaster, an interesting take on globalization (really!), and the latest from a master thriller writer...You'll Innocents and Othersfind all of this and more in the second installment of the Best Books of March.

We begin with Dana Spiotta's Innocents and Others, a novel about two filmmaker friends that Editorial Director Sara Nelson says will surely "get under your skin." Reminiscent of Jennifer Egan's A Visit to the Goon Squad, this novel slyly examines how "all of our devices--technological and otherwise--meant to help us communicate, really do the opposite."

Browse the rest of the best below.

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Eruption by Steve Olson
 
The fascination with the Mount St. Helen's disaster endures with Steve Olson's Eruption. Senior Editor Jon Foro says that it masterfully "examines the forces at work--volcanic, economic, political, and historical--to tell a story at both geologic and human scales, documenting in thrilling fashion the demise of an iconic landscape as well as those who witnessed it."
 

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From Silk to Silicon by Jeffrey E. Garten
 
As Senior Editor Chris Schluep points out, "globalization has been happening for a lot longer than there has been a word to describe it." Beginning with Genghis Khan, "Jeffrey E. Garten of the Yale School of Management examines the lives of ten people whose actions contributed to the history of globalization."
 

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Dimestore: A Writer's Life by Lee Smith
 
"What is it about Appalachia that so captures the mind, echoes in the ear, and lodges in the heart?" Senior Editor Seira Wilson says that Lee's Smith's moving memoir answers this question--it's "a love letter to the people and places that made a writer out of a small town Southern girl."
 

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Fool Me Once by Harlan Coben
 
Checking the nanny cam from work Maya, an ex-special ops pilot, sees her daughter playing with her husband--a man who was supposedly murdered two weeks prior. Reviewer Penny Mann says that Harlan Coben's latest "is a thrilling and twisted adventure as [Maya] tries to find out what is and isn't real."
 


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